TAPEFS(4)                                               TAPEFS(4)

     NAME
          32vfs, cpiofs, tapfs, tarfs, tpfs, v6fs, v10fs, zipfs -
          mount archival file systems

     SYNOPSIS
          fs/32vfs [ -b blocksize ] [ -m mountpoint ] [ -p passwd ] [
          -g group ] file
          fs/cpiofs
          fs/tapfs
          fs/tarfs
          fs/tpfs
          fs/v6fs
          fs/v10fs
          fs/zipfs

     DESCRIPTION
          These commands interpret data from traditional tape or file
          system formats stored in file, and mount their contents
          (read-only) into a Plan 9 file system.  The optional -p and
          -g flags specify Unix-format password (respectively group)
          files that give the mapping between the numeric user- and
          group-ID numbers on the media and the strings reported by
          Plan 9 status inquiries.  The -m flag introduces the name at
          which the new file system should be attached; the default is
          /n/tapefs.

          32vfs interprets raw disk images of 32V systems, which are
          ca. 1978 research Unix systems for the VAX (512 byte block
          size, the default), and also pre-FFS Berkeley VAX systems
          (1KB block size).

          Cpiofs interprets cpio tape images (constructed with cpio's
          c flag).

          Tarfs interprets tar tape images.

          Tpfs interprets tp tapes from the Fifth through Seventh Edi-
          tion research Unix systems.

          Tapfs interprets tap tapes from the pre-Fifth Edition era.

          V6fs interprets disk images from the Fifth and Sixth edition
          research Unix systems (512B block size).

          V10fs interprets disk images from the Tenth Edition research
          Unix systems (4KB block size).

          Zipfs interprets zip archives (see gzip(1)).

     SOURCE

     TAPEFS(4)                                               TAPEFS(4)

          These commands are constructed in a highly stereotyped way
          using the files fs.c and util.c in /sys/src/cmd/tapefs,
          which in turn derive substantially from ramfs(4).

     SEE ALSO
          intro(5), ramfs(4).